The Bananas-Only Diet: Banana Milk!

June 10, 2013

Freelee, the woman who inspired me to take up the week-to-month-long bananas-only diet, has a recipe for banana milk which is included in her video about the diet. I’ve made it, and it’s tasty and super simple and is a fantastic way to eat a lot of bananas quickly. It’s also extremely nutritious and hydrating, making banana milk an almost perfect beverage. Below is the recipe!

Ingredients:

  • 5 medium bananas
  • 1.25 liters (a little more than 5 cups) of water
  • A couple of drops of pure vanilla extract
  • What You Need:

  • A large blender
  • Directions:

    1. Put all ingredients in a blender.
    2. Liquefy/purée.
    3. Pour in a glass and enjoy!
    4. 20130609-215011.jpg

    Notes:

  • If you don’t have a large blender, divide the recipe in half.
  • Add more water to make the milk more liquidy, or use less water to make the milk less liquidy.
  • Try using banana milk instead of regular milk for cereal, oatmeal, etc.
  • Advertisements

    The Bananas-Only Diet: Day 1

    June 8, 2013

    Today I started a short-term diet where I eat only bananas. At least 30 bananas per day, nothing else except water, for 1 week to 1 month. The idea is that I’ll have more energy and my overall physique will improve, and next Friday I’ll assess my body to confirm everything. I’m guessing that I’ll want to move forward through to a full month, but we’ll see.

    I know that this sounds crazy, but Freelee uploaded a video recommending the cleanse and she makes a compelling argument for it. Her video really inspired me, and coupled with the data I present here it might inspire you too. This bananas-only diet is nutritionally sound, at least for the short amount of time (relatively) I’ll be on it.

    My Stats 06/07/2013:
    Gender: Male
    Age: 22
    Weight: 120 lb
    Height: 5’8″
    BMI: 18.2
    Weight Goal: Maintain Weight
    Calorie Ratio Target: 80% Carbs, 10% Protein, 10% Fats

    Cron-O-Meter, a fantastic nutrition tracker that I use, takes the above data and calculates the amount of vitamins, minerals, carbs, protein, and fats which I need to be healthy and meet my goals. In percentages, the data which follows is the amount of each nutrient I get from eating 30 bananas in a day, relative to my daily requirements (as calculated by Cron-O-Meter). The nutrients which this diet is deficient in are in red.

    (Note: The nutrients which don’t have a target aren’t listed.)

    General:
    Kcals: 153%
    Carbs: 196%
    Protein: 75%
    Fats: 51%

    Carbs:
    Fiber: 279%

    Protein:
    Cystine: 170%
    Histidine: 577%
    Isoleucine: 105%
    Leucine: 130%
    Lysine: 125%
    Methionine: 61%
    Phenylalanine: 294%
    Threonine: 140%
    Tryptophan: 170%
    Tyrosine: 54%
    Valine: 136%

    Fats:
    Omega-3: 69%
    Omega-6: 11%
    Saturated: 23%

    Vitamins:
    B1: 105%
    B12: 0% (which my B12 supplement addresses)
    B2: 229%
    B3: 170%
    B5: 273%
    B6: 1152%
    Choline: 73%
    Folate: 204%
    Vitamin A: 14%
    Vitamin C: 394%
    Vitamin D: 0% (which sunlight addresses)
    Vitamin E: 27%
    Vitamin K: 17%

    Minerals:
    Calcium: 20%
    Copper: 353%
    Iron: 133%
    Magnesium: 275%
    Manganese: 479%
    Phosphorus: 128%
    Potassium: 311%
    Selenium: 74%
    Sodium: 3%
    Zinc: 56%

    In other words, bananas contain some amount of every nutrient that you need (ignoring vitamins B12 and D), and 30 bananas in a day without anything else is more than enough for most nutrients. Your daily needs will be different than mine unless you have my exact same build and goals, though a month — let alone a week — on this diet isn’t near-enough time for the select deficiencies to negatively affect your health.

    Care to join me? :-)


    Being A “Big Fruit Eater” In Public

    June 5, 2013

    Two nights ago in a New Seasons I built and two Grapefruit Salads, five bananas, and a bag of grapes. Another customer sitting down looked over at me eating probably 10 lb of fruit, and asked me “Are you a big fruit eater?” I responded that I’m a fruitarian, so yeah. He inquired further — “you only eat fruit?”, “how do you get protein?”, etc. — and I answered all of his questions.

    One of the most fascinating things about this fruitarian lifestyle, is how complete strangers solicit me. It’s very strange, people seem to either be curious and interested, or they’re insecure and detest me because of my diet. There’s no-one in the middle — at least not that I’ve seen — and the behavior is fascinating to observe.

    I think that as a fruitarian it’s important to be a big fruit eater in public. The people who are curious why I’m eating a mountain of fruit will inquire, and my answers to their questions could change their life. For example, the man who asked me if I was a big fruit eater walked away from New Seasons two evenings ago with a new perspective on fruit. Knowing that fruit has protein, he’s now more likely to increase his fruit intake which is beneficial to his health.

    It’s probably not highly likely, but I might’ve helped extend a stranger’s life by a few years. It’s an opportunity which most people don’t often get, yet I can’t go a day without being solicited about my diet. That idea is an intense confidence booster, and I look forward to the day when more people experience it.


    Recipe: Grapefruit Salad (With Photos!)

    June 5, 2013

    I was out last night and in the mood for something exciting and tasty and filling. However, I obviously wasn’t carrying a blender, food processor, or juicer, so all I had was the produce section of a New Seasons (organic grocery store) and the free knife and fork which they loan to people eating in. So I made a fantastic layered fruit salad which I would even be proud to serve to guests at my home. Here is the recipe with pictures.

    What You Need:

  • 1/2 large grapefruit (including skin)
  • 1 medium banana
  • 1 handful of cherries
  • Directions

    1. Carve the grapefruit’s flesh out of its skin, making what is the bowl for this fruit salad.
    2. 20130604-222111.jpg

    3. The first layer of fruit is half of the banana, sliced to your liking.
    4. 20130604-222212.jpg

    5. The second layer is the cherries. If they aren’t pitted already, pit them over the “bowl” so that the juice adds extra flavor to the banana layer. Once the cherry layer is added, press it down.
    6. 20130604-222345.jpg

    7. The third layer of this salad is the grapefruit’s flesh, which you’ll want to also slice up.
    8. 20130604-222456.jpg

    9. Then top of your grapefruit salad with the other half of your banana, again sliced to your liking. And you’re done!
    10. 20130604-222544.jpg

    Notes:

  • If you substitute the cherries with grapes, this becomes a purely detox fruit salad.
  • For bigger fruit salads, you can substitute the grapefruit and its skin with a melon and it’s shell.

  • Fruit for

    June 4, 2013

    It’s official, I have a fruitarian blog up and I’m super excited about it. Click or tap here to visit Fruit for, my third blog and maybe my most important so far.

    As of this writing Fruit for has information about fruitarianism, why I adopted the lifestyle, a FAQ which addresses nutritional concerns, and other relevant info. As time passes the site will also fill up with blog entries about my experiences as a fruitarian, recipes, and whatever I feel should be read. I also plan on putting up videos eventually, which I’m looking forward to.

    The exciting thing about having this third blog is that I now have to simplify and streamline my life. I need to create a schedule that encourages keeping every blog active, getting back into webcomics, and excelling at my new job. Currently my days are inconsistent and I’m very excited to amp up my productivity. This is also good for you fine people, my readers. :-)

    Thanks for everything!

    Tanner


    Welcome to Fruit for!

    May 21, 2013

    Three months ago the idea of me being a food blogger would’ve been crazy (the idea of a fruitarian blogger would’ve seemed impossible). It’s amazing how quickly time can change things.

    I’m Tanner, by the way. Nice to meet you.

    Expect to see updates in the form of vlogs, recipes with photos, and articles. I imagine this blog will be updated at least once or twice each week.

    In the meantime I’m working on getting a solid amount of static information into the sidebar to your left.

    I hope you enjoy your stay, and if you need me to help you out with your diet (or if you have any questions in general), check out the contact link to your left and get in touch.

    Thanks!

    Tanner


    Health Before Wealth

    April 16, 2013

    I’m sitting here at my desk at 5:00 AM, full of energy, contemplating the day ahead. Portland Fruit West — my grocery store since adopting a fruitarian lifestyle — opens at 9:00 AM and I’m almost out of food. At 7:00 AM I’m going to have a peanut butter sandwich* and a whole grapefruit and be on my way, since I have black beans being prepared and need to be back to cook them at 10:30 AM. As I leave PFW I’ll snack on two pears, and upon my return I’ll probably eat four bananas. My next meal will be two cups of the finished black beans and a tomato at 12:00 PM. I’ll follow up with four hours of sleep, and eat three oranges at 4:30 PM. At 7:00 PM, I’ll treat myself to two apples and a cucumber. At about 8:00 PM I’ll exercise until I’m tired, and fall asleep at 10:00 PM until probably 2:00 AM tomorrow.

    Or something along those lines. I’m not fully sure of most of that order until my body tells me what it wants. I’ll actually probably end up eating more.

    An interesting note is that, in-between all that food, I’ll be preparing for an interview for a really god job tomorrow, alongside preparing some ideas for next month’s newsletter at a little nonprofit which I’ve been recently signed onto. I’ll also be preparing for another interview at another nonprofit, writing blog entries, gearing up on the Processing coding language more, and hopefully getting a decent amount of exercise in. This type of day is unprecedented for me; I’m managing a perceived huge food intake (for me), exercise (something I never did), but most notably, recently acquired responsibilities and opportunities.

    I know that my endless raving about the changes that I’ve seen since adopting a fruitarian lifestyle can get old, but at a month and a half in, I’m noticing so many differences in me physically, mentally, and professionally, that I feel I have valuable insight to offer.

    Michael Arnstein, one of the best runners in the U.S., is a fruitarian and passionately advocates for the lifestyle. One thing he said [YouTube link] that was really inspiring to me was, that a fruitarian lifestyle can get expensive, but that it’s important to ignore the costs because the improved you will be more equipped to make more money. Instead of letting yourself deteriorate waiting for the ability to live healthily, try investing in your health first and make yourself better. Since hearing his words, I’ve upped my food intake by 4x, purchased a gym membership, either walk or jog to any destination less than 3.5 miles away from my starting point, and my professional life has begun to rapidly increase.

    (Heck, and yesterday my bank increased my credit limit by $100. So obviously my credit rating is improving rather spontaneously.)

    This means that I currently have no spare cash to spend anymore. Despite the fact that the majority of my food is local and cheap, my weekly food bill stands between $30 and $40. When I first started a fruitarian lifestyle my weekly bill was between $10 to $15, and I have no reason to believe that my cost-of-living will stop going up the more I exercise and the more I eat to offset it. Every penny I used to be able to save for movies, or songs, or anything I didn’t need, now goes explicitly to my health and fitness. The key word in the previous sentence is currently, and I expect even if one of the opportunities on my horizon comes to pass, I’ll have spare change again — which, admittedly, I’d probably put towards my continued health and fitness.

    It’s important to note that I’m not a dietician and it would be irresponsible of me to tell you to adopt the lifestyle that I have. But I think the idea that you should try to be healthy before being wealthy is a good one. I feel like I’m living in a completely new body, and as I don’t believe in coincidences, these opportunities which now crop up regularly give credence to a health first strategy. And it makes sense; fruitarian or not, a healthier you is a more employable you.

    * The peanut butter is homemade, with the ingredients being peanuts exclusively. I’ll be moving up to almond butter soon. Also, the bread is “Powerseed” (Dave’s Killer Bread). Both the bread and peanut butter fit into my fruits, nuts, grains, and beans diet.


    Ceding Control

    March 29, 2013

    Gossip. We all do it, we all love it, we all live for it. The problem with gossiping is that we tend not to be extremely tactical about it; word gets out to the person that we’ve been talking about behind their back, and mahemy-chaos ensues. Gossip becomes more messy when it spreads and interpretations change — think of the “telephone” game which our teachers made us play as kids — and it’s never good for anybody.

    How do we avoid being talked about behind our backs? The only answer which I can think of is that we’d need to disappear; go away and be forgotten. Humans are social animals and being anti-social isn’t incredibly good for our health, and we’re ceding control of our representation by having friends.

    We like to talk about our lives, and by occupying someone’s time you’re a part of his or her life. Like it or not, right now I’m a minute of your day, and you have the right to rant about me to your friends. I can’t control what you say — you can outright lie about me — and I accept that I can’t speak for myself among your network.

    Unfortunately, as I’ve recently found out, someone who I know personally can’t accept that people talk about him. He will live a sad life if he can’t accept that gossip is a part of it, and it would do you well to embrace back-talk against you too.


    Socially Isolated

    March 25, 2013

    Lastly, keep in mind that a limited diet may cause certain social disruptions. Meals with family and friends may become more difficult. Some people with less flexible food options report social isolation.

    That is the last paragraph in an “Ask Alice!” article about why teens shouldn’t adopt a fruitarian diet.

    I’ll bite. I’ve noticed some “social isolation” since I became a fruitarian, but whose fault is that? Is it mine, for practicing discipline with my diet, or is it the fault of closed-minded people? The following are a select amount of my experiences over my first month of following a fruitarian diet:

  • Some of my friends have called me a freak. One even opted to delete me as a friend on Facebook when I published a post calling out the lies and hypocrisies of unnamed people.
  • Every Saturday I go to breakfast with a group of people. That has now been changed to lunch since “whole wheat toast and a side of fruit” isn’t a suitable breakfast order, apparently.
  • In addition, I’ve been excluded from many dinners with friends because they don’t think that I’d eat anything.
  • Whatever “social isolation” that I’ve experienced is the result of ignorance of my diet, not my diet. If I was able to educate people about how healthy I am, they wouldn’t think that I’m killing myself. If I educated people about how “whole wheat toast and a side of fruit” is perfect since I’m supposed to eat small meals throughout the day, they might accept that as a legitimate order.

    Again, it isn’t my diet that’s the problem, it’s the ignorance towards my diet which can be solved with education. I hope the information presented here serves that purpose. Today I scored an “A” nutrition grade on About.com’s Calorie Count. What follows is the analysis of my day.

    327g Carbohydrates (good)
    60g Protein (good)
    40g Fats (good)
    6g Saturated Fat (good)
    0g Cholesterol (good)
    1911mg Sodium (good)
    74g Fiber (too high)
    3056IU Vitamin A (too low)
    3056mg Vitamin C (too high)
    466mg Calcium (too low)
    13mg Iron (too low)

    1745 Calories eaten
    2362 Calories burned

    I need to work on my vitamin distribution a little bit, but otherwise, I’m likely getting a better distribution of nutrients than most people, as evidenced by my “A” grade on Calorie Count. Probably around 95% of the food I ate today was fruit (including vege-fruit), the rest was composed of beans, nuts, and grains. And this makes me a freak? What follows is the food I ate today.

    3 Oranges
    2 Apples
    2 Bananas
    1 Grapefruit
    1 Cucumber
    2 cups Pinto Beans
    2 slices Pineapple
    1 Peach
    10 Gojiberries
    1 Tomato
    2 slices “Powerseed” bread (Dave’s Killer Bread)
    2 tbsp Natural Peanut Butter

    It wouldn’t be a bad idea to eat one less orange and one more peach. Maybe add coconut, tofu, and soy milk to the mix the next time I go food shopping. I also have a lot of walnuts which I would do well to munch on.

    How in the world is a fruitarian diet bad by default? I’m curious how your diet stacks up to mine. If I had to, I’d wager that it wouldn’t be a bad idea for you to take cues from my A-grade diet. What I eat doesn’t make me a freak, it makes me rational and highly disciplined.

    When I first started this diet I had decided that I wouldn’t be picky when I ate out with people, that I wouldn’t be that guy who doesn’t just pick a meal off of the menu. But it’s become my responsibility to not try to simply please crowds by following their expectations.

    I’m very good at articulating ideas, and I’d be doing harm to fruitarians today and in the future if I let the idea that we’re social lepers propagate. I need to be a jerk (perceived) who says “no” to the food at a Thanksgiving dinner table. I can’t lie to be accepted, and I need to prove-by-example that my diet is as healthy — or healthier — than the average person’s.

    I can’t wait for my diet to be accepted.


    Wearable Computing: The Future?

    March 21, 2013

    One topic that has been plaguing much of the tech news cycle is how glasses by Google and potential watches by Apple and electronic shoes by who-knows-who are the next big thing. These devices — the real and the rumored — act as an accessory-type interface for the phones in our pocket, and the idea that it’s the future is nonsense.

    The fantastic thing about post-PC devices is their reluctance to accessory-type interfaces like (hardware) keyboards and mice. Post-PC devices are free from the user-facing complexities that traditional computers have. Interface-removal is a trend that needs to continue, not reverse, which is what the people promoting watches and glasses oppose. What follows is my view of what the next wave of computing will be.

    We do everything on our phones; The phone is the life, Mr. Renfield. So we don’t need new ways to do the things we already do with our phones; we need our phones to do what they do now with less user-effort. That requires our phones to be smarter and capable of learning what we want them to do. As an example:

    At present, when I walk into my favorite Starbucks, my iPhone knows and a Passbook notification for my digital Starbucks card appears on my iPhone’s lock screen. I then swipe the notification and put my phone next to a scanner at the register, and my Earl Grey tea is paid for.

    In the future, not only will my iPhone know that I’m walking into my favorite Starbucks, it will also know that I’m going to order a tall Earl Grey tea and it will order the drink for me over WiFi. I won’t have to stand and wait in a line, I’ll just walk into the Starbucks and my drink will be paid for and in the queue with absolutely no effort on my part.

    That’s the near-future (10 years give-or-take a few) of computing that I see. I see our phones not only being the hub for everything we do, but also taking over our current responsibilities. It’s a future where our devices are invisible to us and not a distraction. Where most things are done without us even knowing that they’re done; the complete opposite of having computers strapped to our body which makes us see everything always.


    %d bloggers like this: