21.5: We Got The Beat

January 27, 2013

Honestly the title has nothing to do with the following article, it’s just the song I’m listening to at the moment which happens to rock.

I mentioned recently that I’m planning on outright removing traditional web browsers from my life (with very few exceptions), and I don’t think that I explained why. I hope that this entry can make my stance crystal clear so that we can have an understanding.

I have a history of abandoning technologies and services that I view as being on the way out. Be it Adobe Flash, traditional computers (with exceptions), and even e-mail (with exceptions), I’ve consistently put my money where my mouth is. I’ve inconvenienced myself for a bit of time, but I’m vindicated with Flash and traditional computers.

As far as I can see, e-mail too is on its path towards irrelevance, meaning that I need to find more dying technologies to get rid of. Based on my own observations the next thing to die is traditional web browsers. Dedicated service apps — from social networking to media to news — are the future and I aim to help show people why traditional web browsers are antiquated comparably.

At the moment I’m thinking up a list of rules for myself and others to follow once written and published. Getting rid of traditional web browsers is so much more complex and harder than any other tech I’ve shelved because, at least at present, they’re integral to our lives.

I’ve learned recently, however, that traditional web browsers slow me down in the face of apps dedicated to services like Flipboard. Finding news is so much faster with that than it ever can be using a traditional web browser; I’ve been a fool to avoid Flipboard as long as I have simply because of its dumb animation.

The Flipboard, Tweetbot, TechCrunch, and Pocket [iTunes links] iOS apps are what make this blog possible. (slightly) unkommon was a slow-to-publish, aimless mess before I decided to start waning off of the Safari web browser to find information.

Today I can A) find approximately 20 articles that interest me, B) narrow them down to nine, C) write a paragraph or two about each one, D) write a 300-to-500 word post about something random, and E) edit it all in less than three hours. I find that kind of phenomenal, particularly as a junior writer. I can credit having an iPad mini as a companion to my big iPad as speeding me up, but the real stars are the news and information apps.

As always, the only way to usher in the future is to live in it prematurely. Be the change that you want to see in the world, and you can move mountains; at least that’s what I believe. And traditional web browsers will almost cease to exist in the future that I want to see.

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